Bogs and Acidic Peatlands of Southern New England by Marsha C. Salett
Taxonomy
Hypericum mutilum L.
CLUSIACEAE (Mangosteen Family)
EtymologyHypericum is derived from the ancient Greek word for St. Johnswort, hypereikon: hyper= above and eikon = picture, and so named because the flowers, which bloom in late June, were placed above images to ward off evil spirits at the ancient midsummer festival of Walpurgisnacht; mulitum is Latin for mutiliated.
DescriptionDwaft St. John's-wort is a small, many-branched, annual or perennial herb that grows 4-30" tall. It has opposite leaves and branches, with tiny yellow flowers clustered at the branch tips.
Wetland indicator statusFACW
Plant Height4-30 inches
LeavesOpposite, simple, entire; 2/5 -- 1" long; ovate to elliptical, with a blunt tip and rounded base; sessile.
Flower/InflorescenceYellow, tiny (3/16" wide), 5 petals, in small clusters at tips of branches.
FruitCapsule, tiny (3/16 -1/4"), green, single compartment.
HabitatPond and stream margins, wet meadows, moist to wet soil.
RangeNewfoundland and Quebec to Manitoba; south to Florida and Texas.
(c) 1998-2006 Marsha C. Salett